“Friend” Are You Sure?

In preparation for Good Friday, I was reading in Matthew 26. I was struck by the word Jesus chose to describe Judas when he betrayed him. It is a familiar story. Judas had agreed to give the authorities Jesus in exchange for money. When Judas and the mob approached Jesus, Jesus said,

Friend, do what you came to do.” (Mt 26:50)

Are you not puzzled that Jesus would use the word “friend” to describe Judas? How could he use such a word?

Unfortunately, in English, we only have one word to describe associates. The Greek is more specific. Jesus uses the word philos to represent his real friends. Notice the following example:

“You are my friends if you do what I command you. No longer do I call you servants, for the servant does not know what his master is doing; but I have called you friends, for all that I have heard from my Father I have made known to you.” (Jn 15:14-15)

Jesus did not use the word philos, “true friend” when he talked with Judas. He used another word, hetairos. What is the difference between these two words?

“The study of the word hetaíros causes us to conclude that it could not be used as synonym with phílos, a true friend who seeks the other’s good. Hetaíros is one who only projects his own interest. The inference, therefore, is that hetaíros means a selfish acquaintance, one who seeks his own interests above the interests of others.[1]

So what does this word choice mean in the confrontation of Jesus and Judas? Zodhiates continues his insight by saying, “the Lord called him hetaíre, indicating that while Judas was giving Him a kiss pretending that he was a friend, all he was interested in was the thirty pieces of silver. Therefore, the meaning of the word is a person who attaches himself to another for what he can get out of him, a leech or a phony friend as we would say in our culture today, a selfish comrade.”[2]

Isn’t the Bible amazing?! Jesus’ word choice reveals the true intent of Judas,  I can only imagine that such a term used to describe Judas would be condemning for him to hear. Jesus understood his motive for following Him. Judas only followed Jesus for personal gain.  He had not embraced Jesus as Savior and God. Even so, and for our benefit, Jesus allowed this betrayal to happen!

Father, may I be a true friend of yours. One who seeks to do your will for your benefit and not selfishly try to use my relationship with you for my own interests. Help me to live in constant fellowship with you.

Following Jesus with you,

 

 

[1] Spiros Zodhiates, The Complete Word Study Dictionary: New Testament (Chattanooga, TN: AMG Publishers, 2000).

[2] Ibid.

One thought on ““Friend” Are You Sure?

  1. Hi Jeff,
    This was really interesting and it is amazing how our English translation doesn’t always convey the true meaning and the study of that one word adds so much insight.
    Easter Blessings!
    ❤️ Randy and Jo

    Like

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